You can only add photos of yourself from Facebook or Instagram, though, which is kind of limiting if you’re not very active on either. Also, while the friends-of-friends concept has a lot of benefits, it’s also restricting. It’s possible to run out of matches after 10 minutes of browsing, which is a letdown if you’re actually enjoying the app or are serious about finding a date.

Clover is an up-and-coming dating app. It's a more traditional dating app. You'll search for people like you and hopefully it works out. It offers the ability to set up dates, join mixers, find events, and a lot more. Unlike most, this one boasts a free chat. You can also set your profile to just look for friends instead of dating. That makes it somewhat decent for platonic relationships as well. It's not overly popular so you may not find many results in your area. However, the reviews are more positive than most. This one has a bit of a problem with spam bots, though. We recommend some patience if you use this one.
The OG of the dating world, Match has been around since the '90s. It not only set the standard for dating apps, but also gives the most reasons to keep coming back. It's a friendly ecosystem where profiles reward extra effort, but photos aren't forgotten about. Searches are quick and easily tailored and you get daily matches that seem like more than just a reason to get you to spend money. Should you decide to open your wallet, it offers enough extra perks to feel like you've spent your money well.
Bumble was founded by Whitney Wolfe, a woman whose goal was to make dating (and now, even networking and friendship) more female-friendly. How that manifests on the app, for the uninitiated, is a Sadie Hawkins-esque interface that requires women to message their male matches first. Then men have 24 hours to respond or else the match is erased. (For women messaging other women and women-identified folks, either party can respond first.) Although this ostensibly puts the power into women’s hands, it’s also the biggest complaint I heard about Bumble while researching this piece, calling it “annoying” and “overwhelming” (and the reason a few dating-haters I spoke to defected to Tinder). But lots of respect to any app that's actually trying to make women feel safer online, and Bumble has made that its priority.
That having been said, using an app to get lucky also has its downsides. Putting out feelers for a casual hookup to strangers you haven't met yet can get dicey fairly quickly. Figuring out the right approach can take some time, too. You want to make your intentions known, but you need to do so in a way that doesn't come off too strong or make her feel uncomfortable. You'll need to exchange a few messages to see if you two are feeling each other, but you don't want to become pen pals with someone you're just trying to get it on with, either.
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