Niche dating sites are for daters looking to find others with common interests, lifestyles, or beliefs due to their religious, cultural, or lifestyle choices. When signing up for a niche dating site, most people are under the impression that others on the site want similar things. This means they will have to spend less time filtering out irrelevant profiles and can spend more time connecting with like-minded people. A niche site is tailored to specific people and their interests. For example, a religious dating site (like Christian Connection) is more likely to have specific denominations of churches rather than just a generic umbrella term.
The paid membership also allows you to keep track of various useful connections such as users you have sent winks to. Moreover, you can remove members you are not interested in from search results. This enables you to make room for other possible connections. On the other hand, other members can also find you. You get a dedicated email address that enables you to communicate privately and safely with other users on the site.
If the thought of signing up for an online dating service without any help is scary, you can hire a ghostwriter to help you out. You might have even encountered some of these ghostwriters yourself and not have known it. Essentially, writers are paid to build your profile in a way that’s pleasing and more likely to get you dates. Thrillist even profiled an online dating ghostwriter who took details submitted by would-be daters and turned them into dating bios and even conversation starters. If this sounds like something you would benefit from, there are numerous services you can sign up for. 

Finding love in the age of Tinder is no easy feat. Instead of phone calls, there’s the cryptic text message; instead of maturely calling it quits, there’s ghosting (or worse, breaking up via Snapchat); and instead of blind dates, there is a veritable sea of dating apps to navigate. Are you busy and ambitious? Do you read your horoscope every morning? Can you craft a perfect playlist? There’s a dating app for you! Unfortunately, finding the right dating app isn’t so easy (as if finding a perfect match weren’t hard enough).
JSwipe is a Jewish dating app. You upload photos of yourself and scroll through other user profiles in the hopes of matching. This app is unique in that your matches expire in 18 days, so you've got to start chatting and schedule a date quickly. Everything is free to use but you can pay extra for "super swipes" to show a person you're extremely interested in them. This is a location-based app, so it's likely to work best in large cities.
Bumble works on a similar basis to Tinder. It's free, easy to set up and simple to use, and a right swipe indicates a like. A key difference, however, is that women have to begin the conversation, thus avoiding the countless cringey messages of Tinder. There's also a 24-hour time limit to start chatting, so if you find your soulmate you'd better move quickly. 

Why it's awesome: When we're blinded by love, we tend to ignore red flags and can't see when someone is all wrong for us — but friends can see it clear as day and wish we would just take their damn advice. Wingman is the unique take on dating that lets your friends play cupid, essentially making it the dating app version of the "Have you met my friend?" classic bar line. Your friends want to see you get laid (or find love, obviously) as badly as you do, and sometimes, they just know us better than we know ourselves. As Mashable's Cassie Murdoch writes, "...a little bit like handing your friend your Tinder or Bumble account and saying, 'Here, you deal with this.'" And sometimes, fancy algorithms just aren't enough.
On Hinge users are asked questions like, “What are you looking for?” and “Who is your ideal celebrity dinner date?” Says Slater: “It allows you to get a better sense of their personality outside of their abs. I also haven’t had to swipe with Hinge because when people go through my profile, all they have to do is like my answers or my photos and they’ll get put in a queue that I can look through, knowing they’ve already expressed interest. It really streamlined the whole process in terms of quality and efficiency.”
We have to give a shoutout to Match's web developers: The site actually looks nice. If you're someone who appreciates a clean, minimalistic design, you'll be more than content here. For those who've grown accustomed to design-forward sites and apps, Match hits that mark. It has all of the stuff you need, and none of the stuff you don't. The desktop version is good, but the smartphone app version is even better. This is smart, as most people are on the go and will be using Match on their phone way more than on their computer.

Matches are location-based so you only see people near the city you set in your profile. If you travel and want to see if there are any matches in your area, you need to change where you are in your profile. The app also has a "We Met" section where you can leave feedback after any Hinge date. It's almost like leaving a Yelp review for a person. Users can also specify whether they have kids, want kids, have any strong religious beliefs or vices. This gives you a little more of an in-depth look at a potential mate than some dating apps. Hinge is only available as an app and it's free, but you can pay for a membership if you want extra perks like being able to use additional filters, see likes you've received and access Hinge experts to help you along the way.
Specifying the age range and gender that you're looking for in a partner does squat to narrow down your options. Considering Zoosk sees a user base of about 40 million members, getting through all profiles that match your requirements could take ages, especially if you're looking for more than a hookup. By monitoring your swiping behavior, Zoosk can tap into your subconscious (okay, not really, but sorta) and give you what you want deep down. However, if you want to boost your profile or send more than a few messages, you'll have to buy and participate in Zoosk's coin game, which is more irritating than fun.
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