What's this app's deal? God. Where do we begin? Raya is an exclusive dating app that requires a membership and also costs $7.99 a month. You cannot just JOIN Raya, you must know someone already using the app and be invited. This is already annoying, but I also saw it as a potentially good thing because maybe having to work so hard to get on this damn app meant that people would take it more seriously. (I was wrong. Moving on.) The thing that sets this app apart from others is the reputation it has for celebrities using it (kind of true, in my experience) and the fact that screenshots are strictly forbidden. If you screenshot, you will get a warning and if you screenshot again, you will get kicked off.
Nope, sorry. This isn't the place to find a friends with benefits situation, and you're going to look pretty strange if you slide into someone's messages and propose that. Most users will mention what they're using Match for in their bio, and I have yet to see someone say that they're looking for something casual. No one is going to shell out $30 a month to find a hookup. They can do that for free at the bar.
Hacke also recommends testing the waters before proposing a hookup. "Try to get flirtatious and see how she responds," he says. "As long as your would-be hookup partner is matching your flirtatiousness beat for beat without appearing put off or weirded out, you're not doing anything wrong. You can gradually escalate the nature of your flirting until you've advanced to sexual innuendo. At that point, if she still seems interested, you've got a green light of sorts to attempt to initiate a hookup."
My favorite part was that they allowed you to specify what you want in a partner: You'll choose which of those same personality traits you're looking for in someone else and rate how important they are to you. For instance, I'd prefer someone who doesn't smoke cigarettes, but it's not a deal breaker — Match lets you specify that preference exactly, and if you choose "This is a deal breaker," they won't give you potential matches that had that in their answers. This is a super simple way to make sure you're at least somewhat on the same page as someone and gets the surface-level things out of the way. This means that those awkward conversations don't come up two months into the relationship. Finding someone who has the same values as you is just as important as finding someone with good communication skills and the rest of that mushy stuff.

What's this app's deal? Bumble is a dating app created by one of the co-founders of Tinder who happens to be a woman. In straight matches (like mine), women are required to make the first move. The idea is that women will receive less creepy messages and be more in control of the conversation. There is also opportunity to answer questions about yourself, so I liked it for the most part because it was a pretty good indicator of whether or not someone and I would get along.


Hinge may seem like it plays second-fiddle to the likes of Tinder, but it has a pretty elite user base (99 percent of its daters went to college, for example). Hinge’s CEO compared his app to Facebook, versus Tinder’s Myspace—sometimes for interface reasons (Hinge is aimed at the college-educated set) and sometimes for class reasons (much has been written on the ways dating app algorithms may favor white people).


Bumble looks eerily similar to Tinder, but functions a tad differently. The big catch with Bumble is that when opposite genders match, the woman must message the guy first — and she has 24 hours to do so. Guys can extend matches for 24 hours, if they’re really hoping to hear from a woman, as can ladies, if they want to initiate something with a match but just haven’t had the time during the first day. For same-gender matches, either person can initiate the conversation first.
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