This dating site boasts over 9 million users. It offers you a chance to meet people who share your values, morals and traditions. It is the most popular specialty dating site online. It is free but you can join premium members for $29.99 a month. The site offers profile matching to help you find a matching friend, lover or spouse. Besides profile matching, you will enjoy other features such as dating tips for Christians, Bible passages, singles events, relationship advice and much more. According to them, connecting single Christians is not a business but a calling.
Why? I pretty much only use Hinge now. I have tried almost all of them: Tinder at one point in college, Bumble, OKCupid, Coffee Meets Bagel .... I found that Tinder was mainly for hook-ups and while I liked that guys were less grimy on Bumble, I’m pretty shy so I didn’t like that I had to be the one to initiate conversation. (Editor's Note: Women seeking men must message first on Bumble; for women seeking women, that rule goes away.) 

OkCupid has insanely cool advertising, making it known that they're LGBT friendly — and the millennials love that shit. I'd guess that more younger people would be attracted to OkCupid because of this, and would also bet that that's where the most liberal users are. OkCupid also apparently has a way to weed out misogynistic jerks, which is by asking users if the government should defund Planned Parenthood or not. While Match will display whether or not someone is religious, there's not really a way to know their political views without asking them — so if that's something you really care about in a relationship, you might choose OkCupid instead. Oh yeah, and all of OkCupid's features are completely free, which is obviously awesome.


The Bumble Fund is an investment fund started by Bumble founder and CEO Whitney Wolfe Herd to help female entrepreneurs get support for their projects and businesses. It’s also a great way to market the company’s networking app Bumble Bizz. The Bumble Fund focuses on getting businesses started with initial funding, ranging anywhere from $5,000 to $250,000, primarily for businesses led by women of color and underrepresented groups.

However, if you’re a woman and you really hate being the first person to initiate a conversation, then Bumble definitely isn’t for you. Profiles are also very short, consisting of a concise blurb and six photos or fewer. This can make it hard to gauge whether or not you’re interested, even at the most superficial level, in someone. Furthermore, because Bumble places the onus on the woman to initiate the conversation, we’ve found that it can attract a more passive crowd than other dating apps.


Match is a great dating site for millennials and more mature people alike, and if you're young and looking for someone in their early to late 20s, you have plenty of options. However, I would love to see Match do some advertising toward the younger crowd like OkCupid does. OkCupid markets specifically to young people (especially those in the LGTBQ+ community) and there's no question that the marketing alone gives it a leg up on places like Match. 
For a great spot to score a date past 40, look no further than Love Again! It’s designed specifically for mature daters (yes, that’s you), so you’ll enjoy the ease, the simplicity and the purpose behind this app. Since you likely want to spend less time thumbing away long-winded apps and more time meeting your could-be partner over drinks, a game of tennis or overlooking art at a gallery opening, you might find this app to be a more natural way to create connection. Depending on your style, you can browse through profiles, join group chats, instant message folks you’re really interested in, ask questions in forums and more.
How it helps introverts: eharmony has a feature called RelyID that helps verify the information provided by other members, like their name, city, and age. You know what that means? No catfishing. Also, your profile is only visible to the people who are a good match for you, so the experience can help to narrow your potentials down to only those who are actually a good fit. 
In the modern era, online dating is so normal that anyone choosing to date without the help of the internet or an app is seen as the weird one. And honestly, given the degree to which technology has infiltrated every aspect of our lives (not to mention many people’s increasingly busy schedules) it makes sense. With more and more of our community engagement moving into the virtual world, there are fewer and fewer places that are actually conducive to approaching people and getting to know them in real life. Turning to online options means being able to meet more potential partners than you’d ever be able to otherwise! The one real drawback here is the abundance of options modern daters face -- there are so many sites and apps out there, and finding the right one (or ones) for you can be a tricky proposition.
Signing up took us about 20 minutes during testing, which is more than twice as long as most of the websites we tested. You answer questions about not only about your appearance, but also about your religious beliefs and career. You then fill out a comprehensive survey regarding what you want in a partner. The questions even go as far to ask whether you want to have kids, which is an important thing to agree on if you're looking for a long-term commitment. You have to pay for a subscription to access most of the features on eharmony, and even though we couldn't read them with a free account, we got nine emails in 24 hours, which was a pretty decent response rate. There is also an eharmony app that's easy to use, making this a great service to try if you want a thorough experience.
Hate anything from slow walkers, to Donald Trump, cargo shorts, the phrase "Live. Laugh. Love," you name it — you know, all of the important stuff that keeps a relationship going. The app is aesthetically pleasing and clearly caters toward a younger, hip crowd, and it's only a matter of time before cynical millennials become obsessed with it. Unfortunately, not a ton of people know about it yet, meaning many of your matches will be far AF away — so if you're looking for a relationship that goes deeper than bitching about something, you might want to use an app with a more robust user base for now. Even with a lack of people, the premise is just too good to pass up. If you download it now, you'll be able to say "I was on that five months ago," when everyone else finds out about it — and you know people hate not being the first to like something.
If you want to know more about someone, you can always just ask the friend you have in common, which is a human touch that’s absent from most apps. Moreover, people can message you only if you’ve matched, so there are no unsolicited “greetings”. You can see what sort of relationship people are looking for, and while that doesn’t sound that revolutionary, it reflects the fact that Hinge carries more of a dating expectation than a just-hooking-up expectation à la Tinder. Furthermore, because of the friends-of-friends connection, you’re less likely to run across inappropriate photos. That’s a plus in our book.
"People didn’t have mobile phones and laptops, and the process was people would go home, log on slowly, see who had written to them and write back," she says. "The courtship process was a lot slower, so it took quite a while to get from the first interaction to actually going on a date. Plus in those days, there was a stigma associated with online dating. You did not tell people you met your spouse, or partner, or even a date online."
Why it's awesome: Hinge marries the modern, instantaneous feel of swiping apps with the relationship atmosphere that sites like eharmony or Match offer. Hinge literally labels itself the relationship app, or as I prefer, the "anti Tinder." You scroll like Instagram, creating a smoother (and less judge-y) feel than swiping. There's a common understanding that this app isn't just for sex, but there's no pressure to rush into a relationship either. It's chill, it's legit, and traditional swiping apps should be worried.
Swiping, browsing, filtering, match recommendations — the dating app you go with should have numerous ways to pair you with that special someone (or someones). Take Match, for instance. This app offers unlimited searching, so you can be in the driver’s seat of your own love life. However, when you want Match to take the wheel, you can go to the Reverse Search and Missed Connections sections — as well as check your inbox — for people the app thinks you’ll like. If you’re testing out an app and it seems like it’s matching features are lacking, you might want to think twice before downloading.

Match.com was founded in the ‘90s and has been a pioneer in the dating industry ever since. No other dating website has been responsible for more dates, relationships, and marriages than Match. Not only that, but with over 13.5 million people visiting Match every month from more than 25 countries, no other dating website has anywhere near the same reach.

If you like the ease of Tinder but are searching exclusively for hookups and only want to match with people of the same mindset, CasualX bills itself as "Tinder minus marriage-minded daters." The app's functionalities are pretty much identical to Tinder, with the main (and, maybe only difference) being that no one here is trying to find anything serious. Using an app where everyone's on the same page undoubtedly increases your success rate for finding a warm, willing body to spend the night with, which makes CasualX an ideal app for hookups.
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